The 2015 BP MS150

Last weekend was our 2nd BP MS150. Unfortunately, weather cut the event in half – the MS Society and event coordinators canceled day 1 of the ride due to bad conditions. It had been raining and storming heavily on and off all week, and we got nailed again Thursday night and Friday night. This caused the campgrounds at the half-way overnight point in La Grange almost completely flooded leaving no place to put 13,000 riders and their tents. With the threat of more storms Saturday night, having a bunch of tents in a soppy field isn’t the best in an electrical storm either. This was only the 2nd time in the entire 31 years the MS150 has been going on that one of the days had to be canceled. But, it is what it is.

So, riders had to find their way out to La Grange to begin on day 2 if they wanted to. I was lucky enough to be given a ride by my wife – who was originally going to be riding with me. But she decided to not ride, and instead gave me a lift out there.

Turns out most of the registered riders wouldn’t let the weather and a distant start line deter them either, as upwards of 10,000 still showed up. The day’s route was slightly altered, giving us about a 70 mile route from La Grange into Austin.

Me & Chainsaw after getting suited up in La Grange

Me & Chainsaw after getting suited up in La Grange

As far as the ride itself – the hills get pretty rough the closer you get to Austin, and this time there was a pretty stiff headwind for pretty much the entire 2nd half of the ride. Plus, it was approaching 90 degrees in the afternoon so that hurt as well.

Pics w/ captions below. Click for larger versions.

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The long flat parts are breakpoints. You can see my long lunch break right in the middle lol

The long flat parts are breakpoints. You can see my long lunch break right in the middle lol

Caught some good speed on a few of the descents as well.

Caught some good speed on a few of the descents as well.

It took almost an hour for me to filter around the village square to the starting line, so I got out a little later than most, and I rolled across the finish line around 4:15pm.

The starting area was the village square in the heart of little La Grange. Riders wrapped around three sides of it and extended down a few of the intersecting streets.

The starting area was the village square in the heart of little La Grange. Riders wrapped around three sides of it and extended down a few of the intersecting streets.

Still going...

Still going…

Looking down finally to the start line all the way to the right.

Looking down finally to the start line all the way to the right.

Almost our turn to set off.

Almost our turn to set off.

Looking behind me at the start line before heading out.

Looking behind me at the start line before heading out.

Once we got rolling it was a blast (duh).

Thankfully, everyone did a good job and rode pretty safely.

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Rest stop #2 - I skipped rest stop #1.

Rest stop #2 – I skipped rest stop #1.

Looking behind me up the hill at the line of riders waiting. There was a rider who went down at the bottom of the hill (about 50 ft in front of where I was standing). They stopped us all, and called in the ambulance. It happened just before we got down the hill. They hauled him out braced up on a stretcher. The bike looked to be in OK condition so I think he maybe got clipped by another rider and went down, which is better than having an incident with a motorist. We waited about 30 minutes and then we were off.

Looking behind me up the hill at the line of riders waiting. There was a rider who went down at the bottom of the hill (about 50 ft in front of where I was standing). They stopped us all, and called in the ambulance. It happened just before we got down the hill. They hauled him out braced up on a stretcher. The bike looked to be in OK condition so I think he maybe got clipped by another rider and went down, which is better than having an incident with a motorist. We waited about 30 minutes and then we were off.

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Sherman resting at the lunch stop. Thanks to Jason's Deli for providing the much needed nourishment!

Sherman resting at the lunch stop. Thanks to Jason’s Deli for providing the much needed nourishment!

Lots of bikes on the rails at the lunch stop.

Lots of bikes on the rails at the lunch stop.

And lots of riders at the lunch stop too.

And lots of riders at the lunch stop too.

Back out on the road.

Back out on the road.

Back out on the road.

Back out on the road.

The mascot for the Houston Dynamo made the ride too! In fact the mascots for the Rockets and the Astros rode too. I don't know they do it without dying of heatstroke but, much respect for them!

The mascot for the Houston Dynamo made the ride too! In fact the mascots for the Rockets and the Astros rode too. I don’t know how they do it without dying of heatstroke but, much respect for them!

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Rocket!

Rocket!

Pulling into the last rest stop. Needed the rest - my legs were killing me. Too bad there were more - worse - hills to come! There was only about 9 miles left.

Pulling into the last rest stop. Needed the rest – my legs were killing me. Too bad there were more – worse – hills to come! There was only about 9 miles left.

The Austin skyline appears. A fabulous site to see.

The Austin skyline appears. A fabulous site to see.

I didn't get a picture of crossing the finish line, so I took this after dropping off my bike and walking back up the hill. Lots of riders still coming across the line, and tons of folks cheering them all on. Incredible experience.

I didn’t get a picture of crossing the finish line, so I took this after dropping off my bike and walking back up the hill. Lots of riders still coming across the line, and tons of folks cheering them all on. Incredible experience.

Facing directly opposite from the previous picture - looking at the Texas State Capital Building. Lots of people take finishing photos holding up their bikes in front of it.

Facing directly opposite from the previous picture – looking at the Texas State Capital Building. Lots of people take finishing photos holding up their bikes in front of it.

We ran into some pretty crazy weather on the way home - rain, lightning, hail, and a tornado watch!

We ran into some pretty crazy weather on the way home – rain, lightning, hail, and a tornado watch!

I want to extend my sincere thanks to the folks at the MS Society for scrambling to give us the ride we were hoping for, and to all the volunteers who helped at the rest stops, the start and finish lines, and everywhere in between. The SAG support along the route is 2nd to none. Y’all helped turn a potential disaster of a weekend into a half-event that was just as fabulous.

And thank you to everyone who donated to our fund raising efforts for the MS Society. Fund raising continues through the end of May, so please donate if you still want to!

And thus ends another MS150 season. It’s started with the Ready2Roll training rides in the beginning of February, and ended last weekend in Austin. And…I can’t wait to do it again next year!

Texas Hill Country: Groundroll 8

A few weeks ago, our company’s EVP invited the wife and I to participate in an invite only small gathering of folks from the E&P industry in the Texas Hill Country. Every year, they get together and bike different routes Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. We’ve never been out to Hill Country before, so we were really excited – especially since it’s such an elite event. We knew we wouldn’t do as well as the regulars because we aren’t super strong cyclists and we’ve never biked in hills like that before, but we were pumped anyway.

It’s held in the little town of Fredericksburg, TX. It’s about a 3 hour drive west from Houston. It’s a fabulous, old, little town with tons of great shops and restaurants nestled into some marvelously nice landscapes. Perfect place for a getaway weekend.
IMG_0962 IMG_0964 IMG_0966 IMG_0967Our group was nestled into a little spot around the town’s few hotels – we had our own tent and basecamp. Meals were catered and we also had a guy from a Houston bike shop for maintenance. The whole setup was pretty awesome. Side note: everyone was endlessly fascinated by my bike and how heavy it was. They couldn’t fathom how I was riding a steel bike that weighed about 30 pounds. About 4 or 5 people picked it up and were flabbergasted lol. But I love my Surly!

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We skipped Friday’s ‘warm-up’ ride since we only took a half day at work, but Saturday and Sunday awaited us.

Saturday’s ride was absolutely brutal. 60 miles of some of the biggest hills I’ve ever been up on a bike (not to mention some absurdly fast descents as well). The wife and I both went the fastest we’ve ever been on a bike before (nearly 40mph). Here is the ride map and the speed/elevation graph for the first day:
Screen Shot 2015-04-08 at 9.53.31 PM Screen Shot 2015-04-08 at 9.52.50 PM IMG_1010 IMG_1009As you can see from the terrain map, we definitely we’re in the flatness of Houston anymore. The two pics from my Garmin are to show my top speed, and the ridiculous total climbing amount we did.

Here are some pics from the first day (captioned with descriptions!)(and as always, click for larger versions!):

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Gearing up to go!

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The starting line. Tradition is to line up front to back by the # of years you’ve been to the event. So, naturally, as first timers, we were last in line – but, not alone! There were a lot of newcomers this year.

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It’s a small event – only 30 or so riders maximum, so once the group spread out you didn’t see many other people at all. It was a quiet, beautiful ride.

It looks flat out in the distance - but it's not.

It looks flat out in the distance – but it’s not.

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The roads were a mix of good and shitty pavement, but they were all back country roads winding through beautiful areas and farms. I lost count of how many cattle grates we went over.

The roads were a mix of good and shitty pavement, but they were all back country roads winding through beautiful areas and farms. I lost count of how many cattle grates we went over.

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Bike selfie!

Bike selfie!

This was the first 'rest stop' - an old schoolhouse. Even though it was a small ride, we still had awesome support with SAG drivers and refreshments.

This was the first ‘rest stop’ – an old schoolhouse. Even though it was a small ride, we still had awesome support with SAG drivers and refreshments.

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If you like, you can take an 8 mile segueway to Enchanted Rock. I'm told the road down to it is an insane downhill where you can reach upwards of 50mph, but the climb back out is agonizing. We skipped it this year. But here are a few pics of it.

If you like, you can take an 8 mile segueway to Enchanted Rock. I’m told the road down to it is an insane downhill where you can reach upwards of 50mph, but the climb back out is agonizing. We skipped it this year. But here are a few pics of it.

Panorama of Enchanted Rock and surrounding area. Click for larger size.

Panorama of Enchanted Rock and surrounding area. Click for larger size.

Cacti!

Cacti!

While most of the herd crossed the street as I was approaching, this one sheep just stood there and stared me down. He finally moved. Cheeky bugger.

While most of the herd crossed the street as I was approaching, this one sheep just stood there and stared me down. He finally moved. Cheeky bugger.

Rest stop 2 - at the top of a big hill at an old church. Perfect spot for some rest and some food.

Rest stop 2 – at the top of a big hill at an old church. Perfect spot for some rest and some food.

After the lunch break we were back into the hills.

After the lunch break we were back into the hills.

The wife!

The wife!

It looks like flat open road, but in fact it was about 4 miles of gentle incline that killed my legs.

It looks like flat open road, but in fact it was about 4 miles of gentle incline that killed my legs.

This was the final pic I took on day 1. There was probably still 20 miles left, and my legs were killing me. So. Many. Hills. LoL. But I can't complain - it was an absolutely beautiful day and a beautiful ride.

This was the final pic I took on day 1. There was probably still 20 miles left, and my legs were killing me. So. Many. Hills. LoL. But I can’t complain – it was an absolutely beautiful day and a beautiful ride.

So after day one, the tradition is after dinner in the tent, everyone tells a story about their ride from the day. It was a lot of fun. I talked about being the last person to finish (I was), and about how being in the back and slow had its perks because we got to see three separate groups of amazing cars drive past us – must have been some sort of rally weekend, or groups out to just enjoy the awesome back roads in their slick machines. Unfortunately I didn’t get any pics of them – but first we saw about 30 Porsches – all makes and vintages. Then a little while later about $15 million in Ferraris went by. It was like, whoa. Again, all makes and vintages. And bringing up the rear of the rally line was my dream car – a white Ferrari Testarosa – yes, Sonny Crockett’s car in Miami Vice. It was beautiful. Lastly, and less impressive, we saw a bunch of BMW’s in rally form go bounding by.

So the first day was brutal and amazing. Day two was supposed to be an ‘easier’ ride – but it wasn’t! Ha. This ride took us down to the tiny town of Comfort, TX, where everyone traditionally stops at a little cafe for some food and drinks. So, the thing about this ride is that apparently the towns of Fredericksburg and Comfort both sit in river valleys – and between them is a big ridge. So going out, you have to climb up out of the first, then enjoy the descent down to Comfort. Easy, right? Nope. It was windy as hell. So windy in fact, that on my ride down the back side of the ridge, I had to pedal to hit 15mph. Yes, after crushing it down hills yesterday at 40mph, I had to pedal to maintain 15mph or the wind held me back to about 12-13. Ugh.

A lot of the folks only ride half of the ride to the cafe, then get rides back – I decided to do this as well. Still managed to get a little over 20 miles though. Here are the maps and some pics!

Check out that terrain, baby.

Check out that terrain, baby.

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It started out looking alright...

It started out looking alright…

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A shot from the top of the ridge, looking down toward Comfort, TX

A shot from the top of the ridge, looking down toward Comfort, TX

Made it!

Made it!

So that was that. We loaded up the bikes and came back to Houston. An incredible weekend in a new part of the state we hadn’t been before. Also probably the most beautiful riding we’ve experienced since leaving Knoxville.

I hope we get invited back next year!

Tour de Houston 2015

This past Sunday was the 100th running, uh, cycling? of the Tour de Houston. Last year was a good time except for getting soaked to the bone by rain. The routes change every year so this year we got to ride through some areas of the city-at-large we don’t usually drive or ride through. The wife and I chose the 40 mile route, which was just long enough. Turnout was good, like last year, and overall the riders were well behaved.

There’s something almost surreal about coming into the city at 6:30 in the morning with the buildings all lit up, and gathering with thousands of other cyclists ready to pedal through the city and out into the burbs. Surreal is probably an overstatement, but it’s really cool – so sue me.

The roads on the route were in good shape, so compliments to the City and their planning of the routes. My only gripe is the lack of good snacks at the rest stops. The ride support and help was great.

Huge shoutout and thanks to the Houston Police and the local constables along the routes, and the hundred or so volunteers for all their help in holding down the intersections, and providing help at the rest stop and on the route. Thank you!!

In the heat of the moment starting off, I didn’t start my GPS. And of course I didn’t notice until we were about 3 miles out. Which is why the starting point of the map below isn’t the same as the end (which was right down in front of City Hall).

I look forward to riding in it again next year and what part of the city they’ll send us to then.

Here are the pics I took along the way.

Here’s the route. The route planners seem to be big on out-and-back, instead of loops. My guess is because it cuts amount of police required to hold up intersections in half. The missing piece of the route before I turned on my GPS was from the red flag heading west down Allen Parkway to Memorial drive.Screen Shot 2015-03-15 at 7.05.04 PM Screen Shot 2015-03-15 at 7.02.26 PM Upset this came out blurry – but, even the iPhone’s camera can’t avoid light & photography physics. This was our arrival around 6:30am.IMG_0870 In the park, signing in at the registration tent, and getting our rider’s packets.IMG_0871Milling around, waiting to line up to go.
IMG_0877 IMG_0879 IMG_0882 Having complete control of the wide open road is so fantastic. I wish it could be like this all the time when riding!IMG_0883 Rest stop #1IMG_0884 Heading down TC Jester Blvd. The riders on the left are already coming back from the turnaround.IMG_0886 Not all the intersections were Police controlled. Sometimes, you just have to wait for the lights.IMG_0887 Over the head shot.IMG_0888 Rest stop #2. This was our turn around point to head back to the start/end.IMG_0890Oh Sherman, you so sexy.
IMG_0893Even though they’ll never see this, I want to say thanks to all the motorists we interacted with all day on the route. We had ZERO issues with them. They were safe and courteous and patient, and for that I am grateful – because, I know we inconvenienced a bunch – I mean just look at our line in the turn only lane!
IMG_0894 Rode with these guys for a few miles. They were hilarious. Dumb & Dumber is one of my favorite movies (how could it not be?) so this was especially awesome. I love folks who go the extra mile like this to really have fun and enjoy the event. Kudos, Harry & Lloyd!IMG_0895 At first I thought this photo wasn’t that great, but then I noticed you could actually see the silhouettes of downtown straight ahead. I just wish it had been sunny.IMG_0896 Going down Washington was annoying because of all the lights. But, we had good cheers from the folks sitting outside at restaurants/coffee shops and from some people in the cars too!IMG_0897 Just about there. The city looms large now.IMG_0899 After the finish line. A panorama of the park where there was live music, booths with beer and food and lots of people just chillin’ after a great time.IMG_0903 IMG_0906 Victory!!
Back at the car ready to head out.

IMG_0907 On the way home we drove past where we had ridden by only an hour or so before. Lots of riders doing the 60 mile route were still coming back – you can see them straight ahead waiting to turn. Also, the guy in front of us had an amazingly sexy classic GTO.IMG_0908A delicious lunch was in order. So, what better place to stop?!
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So there’s the 2015 Tour de Houston! I can’t wait for next year!

Cycling Goals for 2015

2014 was a pretty good year for the wife and I in terms of cycling. In total, I cycled over 2,000 miles. Here’s the screenshot from the MapMyRide dashboard:
Screen Shot 2015-01-18 at 6.36.42 PM630 of those miles were bike commuting to and from work, and that was starting in June(ish).

So here are my goals for 2015:

TotalĀ miles: 3,000

Commuting: 1,500

Based on my round trip distance to and from work (~14 miles) I calculate that I need to ride at least 108 days in order to hit my goal. I think that’s totally doable. It’ll be even easier if I take the same longer router to work that I take home. Though that will require getting up earlier and, well, I’m not a morning person. But I’m fairly sure I can eek out the other 1,500 miles doing the MS150 & it’s weekly training series, along with a few other organized rides like the Tour de Houston, and just going out and doing 40-50 miles on the weekends. 3,000 seems reachable between bike commuting and regular riding.

I’m finally getting back on the bike tomorrow to start this all off. It’s been too long of a break over the holidays and the cold snap we’ve been having down here.

If you’ve made goals for 2015 leave them in the comments!

And please donate to both my wife and myself to help support our participation in the MS150, and the National MS Society! Check out THIS POST to donate. Thanks!

Sherman gets a few updates

So there was this incredibly annoying rattling coming from my handlebars. I thought maybe a mounting screw inside the brake hoods/brakes was loose but upon investigating that wasn’t it. Turns out the spreading bolt on my bar-end shifter had loosened up. Unfortunately, it was impossible to reinsert the bar-end shifter without unwrapping the bar tape so the brake cables could be loose. So, I unintentionally ended up re-wrapping my bars as well.

But

It was good because I was ready for a new color and the orange was getting dirty. This also allowed me the opportunity to move my hoods forward a little (something else you can’t do when your bars are wrapped). I usually order my bar tape from Amazon, but since I needed it immediately, I went to the LBS to grab some. I’ve been very pleased with the Profile Design cork wrap – offers great cushion and looks good. There is only one shop around that I’ve found that sells it but they only carry orange, green, and purple. Three fabulous colors but I’m not much of a purple guy even though it’d probably look great with my green bike. Green obviously is too close in color, and I was trying to switch from orange.

So I went with some Fizik Performance tape, it looked good and felt pretty nice in the box. And for $24.99 it freakin better be. So, I got it in yellow, wrapped up my bars, and Sunday went for a quick 34 mile jaunt – and I was not impressed. Even with gloves on, I felt the tape offered little to no cushion where I needed it – especially the top of the bar, around the bend right behind the hoods – you know, right where that all important ulnar/wrist area rests…
So I think I’ll go ahead and order some of the Profile Design tape in yellow now. Kind of disappointed because I really liked the way it looked.
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The other week I also replaced my brake pads with some new Kool-Stop Salmon pads – hence that signature color accent, they are fabulous.

I also swapped out tires. I had been riding the 700×34 Ritcheys with knobbies that came on the bike (as seen in all my previous photos). But I’ve enjoyed riding on the Bontrager AW-2 700×28 folding tires that are on my commuter bike, so I picked up another pair and put them on Sherman. They are lighter, and ride super smooth. The down side is when the road is not super smooth; because they run with higher pressure my ass feels all those bumps a lot more. Might be time to invest in a carbon fiber seat post!
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I’d like to get lighter wheels – but frankly wheels are absurdly cost-prohibitive. So instead I think the next thing will be to upgrade the crankset.

CA passes 3 ft rule for motorists

California has just become the next state to pass legislation making it the law for motorists to give cyclists in the road a minimum of 3 feet when passing. Remember though, 3 feet is very little. Stand up in your family room and put a yard stick up against your shoulder and stick out straight out to the side. Now imagine you’re on a bike and a big ol’ SUV is roaring past you and it hits the end of that yardstick. Yeah. Remember that when you’re the one driving the SUV.

The state released a fun little PSA to let residents know about it!

2014 Biking goal: complete.

At the beginning of the year I set my mileage goal at 1,500 miles. Finally met it today, and still have four more months to go in the year. I guess that means my goal for 2015 is going to be a little higher! Finally getting back to bike commuting to work almost daily has certainly helped.

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